QUESTS
0
One must keep in mind that communism was actually dependent on a society creating--through a prior phase of industrialization and capitalism--such affluence and abundance that it could meet all citizens' realistic needs (communism as Marx envisioned it requires a post-scarcity economy, among other things). This was never the case in any real, existing society. All "communist societies" were societies that have adopted a state socialism model in order to attempt to bring about a communist society (at least, that's what they claim). It's never actually produced communism, which is likely something that cannot exist. Communism is more like a theoretical utopian goal than an actual real thing. It's an imaginary concept used primarily for engaging in thought experiments--like unicorns or actual free markets. It is unfortunate that, over the years, it has been used to justify a great deal of violence both among different societies and within individual societies.
10/14/19
0
Yet instances of selfish behavior also abound in society. One recent study used a version of the classic Prisoner's Dilemma, which can test people's willingness to set aside selfish interests to reach a greater good. After modeling different strategies and outcomes, the researchers found that being selfish was more advantageous than cooperating. The benefit may be short-lived, however. Another study showed that players who cooperated did better in the long run.
10/14/19
0
Yet instances of selfish behavior also abound in society. One recent study used a version of the classic Prisoner's Dilemma, which can test people's willingness to set aside selfish interests to reach a greater good. After modeling different strategies and outcomes, the researchers found that being selfish was more advantageous than cooperating. The benefit may be short-lived, however. Another study showed that players who cooperated did better in the long run.
10/14/19
1
The is–ought problem, as articulated by Scottish philosopher and historian David Hume (1711–76), states that many writers make claims about what ought to be on the basis of statements about what is. Hume found that there seems to be a significant difference between positive statements (about what is) and prescriptive or normative statements (about what ought to be), and that it is not obvious how one can coherently move from descriptive statements to prescriptive ones. The is–ought problem is also known as Hume's law, or Hume's guillotine.
10/14/19
0
metamitya
metamitya
re-education and rehabilitation :(
re-education and rehabilitation :(
And though she is, and will remain, with us, the incident prompted a volley of abusive and self-righteous rhetoric, drove more than one faculty member to advise students away from courses taught by "that woman," and stirred a renewed emphasis on "re-education" and "rehabilitation." Astonishing, of course, that those very terms — "re-education" and "rehabilitation" — do not scare the hell out of academics who use them and hear them. That they do not call to mind the not so distant history of authoritarian regimes in Europe, or lead on to the thought that "diversity," for many of us in the academy, has now come to mean a plurality of sameness.
10/14/19
0
metamitya
metamitya
keenan defends 2 on 1 by back stepping, gordon counters with knelbo shield
!time:14:15 keenan defends 2 on 1 by back stepping, gordon counters with knelbo shield
14:15 7s
10/14/19
1
The theory for the Invisible Hand states that if each consumer is allowed to choose freely what to buy and each producer is allowed to choose freely what to sell and how to produce it, the market will settle on a product distribution and prices that are beneficial to all the individual members of a community, and hence to the community as a whole. The reason for this is that self-interest drives actors to beneficial behavior in a case of serendipity.
10/14/19