how to argue debate convince politcs
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“Some­body comes in­to your lab and you tell them, ‘You’re part of the blue team,’ ” he ex­plains. “The next per­son who comes in, you flip a coin, let’s say it comes up the oth­er way. And you say, ‘You’re on the red team.’ “ ADVERTISEMENT That’s it. The team­mates nev­er have to meet. Or in­ter­act. There doesn’t need to be any­thing at stake. But with­in minutes, these in­sta-par­tis­ans like their team­mates bet­ter than they like the oth­er guys. And it shows when Van Bavel puts his sub­jects through his MRI doll­house. Red-team mem­bers are more likely to see hu­mans when they’re told they’re look­ing at fel­low red-team faces. Blue-team mem­bers re­spond the same way. Oth­er tests re­veal that red-team mem­bers re­mem­ber red-team faces more ac­cur­ately, and if Van Bavel asks sub­jects to al­loc­ate money, red-team mem­bers will pay out more to their own. Team mem­bers also have less sym­pathy for those on the oth­er side, and even ex­per­i­ence pleas­ure while read­ing about their pain.
metamitya
metamitya
Tribalism is neurologically/subconsciously hardwired.
11/23/15
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Jimmy Carter dis­covered one an­swer dur­ing the 1978 peace ne­go­ti­ations between Egyp­tian Pres­id­ent An­war Sad­at and Is­raeli Prime Min­is­ter Men­a­chem Be­gin. The talks were on the brink of col­lapsing in their fi­nal hours, and the prime min­is­ter was pre­pared to walk. That’s when Carter dir­ec­ted his sec­ret­ary to find out all the names of Be­gin’s grand­chil­dren. Carter auto­graphed pho­tos for them and per­son­ally gave them to the Is­raeli lead­er. “He had taken a blood oath that he would nev­er dis­mantle an Is­raeli set­tle­ment,” Carter later re­called in an in­ter­view. “He looked at those eight pho­to­graphs and tears began to run down his cheeks—and mine—as he read the names.”
11/23/15